Thursday, November 26, 2015

How do Muslims react to Islam related terrorism ?

It is sad for a Muslim who knows his Quran when he hears terrorism has been committed in the name of Islam.
We have just witnessed the brutal and meaningless shooting in Paris and the beheading of Bernard Then by groups that claim to profess the religion of Islam.
The very term “Islamic State” (IS) which for years has been on the lips of many Muslim scholars and even ordinary Muslims who have no idea what it means has today come to stand for barbaric violence against humanity.
It is ironic, certainly, that when the concept of an Islamic State has been touted as a “solution for humankind” by many Muslim quarters before, today it expresses itself in the form of masked men wielding guns and killing people mercilessly.
Even PAS had in the past championed the goal of achieving an Islamic State of sorts with their primary and most important goal being the implementation of its version of hudud passing off as Allah-sanctioned laws. But that is another story.
There are many conspiracy theories abound including the one that IS is actually a Jewish ploy to create havoc in the Muslim world.
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Link here 

Peace !

Sunday, November 22, 2015

Barack Obama: Lessons for "Islamic" Malaysia

Reminds me of many verses in the Quran where Allah "speaks" of diversity of ethnicities, culture and languages as a blessing.


Thursday, November 19, 2015

Do politicians really care?

NOVEMBER 12 — That may be a tough question to answer since politics is seen by some as a means of service to the people. As a teenager, I, too, had the highest of admiration for politicians and an awe for Parliament, respecting them for their sacrifices for the people.
Whenever someone asked me what I want to be when I grow up, I would say “politician” but deep down I wondered if I have the moral strength to sacrifice for the people.
However, as you read more, mix with politicians, and observe, your bubble of the ideal politician begins to pop. I recall one of the earliest groups of politicians to burst my bubble were from PAS. I was about 20 years old then and while in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), I witnessed the power of religion in politics and how politicised religion can lead to cracks between family members and relationships.
It was also in UKM that I witnessed the potential for political extremism and I personally experienced being almost a victim of “religious-based” violence after I had chaired our Economics Faculty’s annual general meeting.
Some of the PAS-aligned students were upset with me for disallowing questions that relate to the so-called lack of “Islamness” of the outgoing Economics Faculty student body. It was such a big matter in UKM then how “Islamic” you are if you wanted to succeed in politics, thanks to the PAS brand of politics.
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Peace !